Archive for January, 2010

Angelic Human Race

January 25, 2010

Adiemus

January 25, 2010

in a moment of peace

January 20, 2010

alternate:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uLOP4vS3o88&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LHXZIWi41yo&feature=related

I Come In Peace

January 12, 2010

J.Hamilton
Norbert Rosing’s striking images of a wild polar bear
coming upon tethered sled dogs in the wilds of Canada’s Hudson Bay


J.Hamilton

The photographer was sure that he was going to see the end
of his dogs when the polar bear wandered in.

J.Hamilton

  J.Hamilton

  J.Hamilton
It’s hard to believe that this polar bear only needed to hug someone!

  J.Hamilton
The Polar Bear returned every night that week to play with the dogs.

OM NAMO BHAGAVATE – Deva Premal

January 10, 2010

Deva Premal and Miten – Gayatri Mantra

January 10, 2010

The Gayatri mantra chanted here is the sacred hymn which one can gain deliverance from material existence and thus attain to the Supreme. Even in English, the word God is etymologically derived from the German Gott which means invoked by or casting spells. So Gayatri is an ancient mantra (formalized prayer) that infuses one with the spiritual power to realize God and one’s Self. All Vedic mantras are written in Sanskrit language or Devanagari (literally spoken by the Gods).  srila108

Gayatri Mantra

January 10, 2010

Revered by both Buddhists and Hindus worldwide. It is considered to be a supreme vehicle for gaining spiritual enlightenment.

The Entire Mantra says, “I invoke the Earth Plane, The Astral Plane, The Celestial Plane, The Plane of Spiritual Balance, The Plane of Human Spiritual Knowledge, The Plane of Spiritual Austerites, and The Plane of Ultimate Truth. Oh, great Spiritual Light which is the brilliance of all Divinity, we meditate upon You. Please illumine our minds.”  

Origin:
Rishis selected the words of the Gayatri Mantra and arranged them so that they not only convey meaning but also create specific power of righteous wisdom through their utterance. The ideal times for chanting the mantra are three times a day – at dawn, mid-day, and at dusk. These times are known as the three sandhyas – morning, mid-day and evening. The maximum benefit of chanting the mantra is said to be obtained by chanting it 108 times. However, one may chant it for 3, 9, or 18 times when pressed for time. The syllables of the mantra are said to positively affect all the chakras or energy centres in the human body – hence, proper pronunciation and enunciation are very important. In general, Brahmarishi Vishwamitra is credited as the mantra-dhrishta(Mantra was revealed to him) of the Gayatri Mantra.

Gayatri Mantra is devoted to God Savitr. Savitr refers to Sun. Sun here does not imply the sun of our solar system. Rather it implies a Sun of all suns. Sun that is the source of eternal light that provides life, knowledge and enlightenment. Light that can illuminate the soul.

By many Hindus, the Gayatri is seen as a Divine awakening of the mind and soul, and within it a way to reach the most Supreme form of existence, and the way to Union with Brahman. Understanding, and purely loving the essence of the Gayatri Mantra is seen by many to be one, if not the most powerful ways to attain God.

Like all other Mantras of Rigveda, Gayatri Mantra is full of praise for the God or Savitr. The beauty of this mantra is that after praising the God, we have admitted that we do not know any better. We are seeking the knowledge to know Him better.

For more information
http://www.gayatrimantra.net

found at:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDjYdpOmV1s

We Can Shift as a Species

January 5, 2010
Hi Aazura

In looking over your site I see the concept that we can shift as a species, if but we would put our attention to it. And, of course, this is true. CORE Resonance is about clearing the human nervous system of trauma and the associated defensive beliefs and postures, i.e., coherence and nonresistance, to allow Innate Intelligence to express itself through us into this dimension. After all, every living thing is no more than an expression of Innate Intelligence expressing itself anyway, right?

As we move to nonresistance, as we move toward Unconditional Love, as we allow Innate Intelligence to express through us (nonresistance/Unconditional Love allows us to access the Unknown), it delivers solutions because Innate Intelligence/the Cosmos is solutions-driven and will simply fill an opening like running water.

So, as we become expressions of Innate Intelligence expressing itself, solutions beyond the mind of man in sync and harmony with a larger order become available and we (the open humans) are the delivery portals. And, when you add the exponential multiplier as described in Dr. David Hawkins’ Map of Consciousness, there becomes a foundational understanding of how this can occur. CORE Resonance understands and addresses this.

It boils down to the power of Love, that capacity to embrace the whole without resistance for which we become an expression of the Universe expressing itself–something barely expressed and even less glimpsed, but available.

Great to be in touch and
Sending you Love, naturally
Namasté
J.Hamilton

Huge Benefits

January 5, 2010

CORE Resonance is my big project and it offers huge benefits.  While I have been meditating for 37 years, it wasn’t until I employed this technology that my personal consciousness advancement went straight through the roof.  It took a while to figure out what was going on but as we clean up the brain, as the brain becomes coherent, as the brain becomes able to process the world better, we move from fear of the unknown to nonresistance and allowing.  In nonresistance, we move away from resistance as a defensive posture and begin to let the order of life into our lives. 

Another way to say it is as we move to nonresistance, we begin to re-enable our connection with Source/Innate Intelligence.  As this connection becomes re-enabled, Innate Guidance shows up and we are able to relax even more—letting Innate Guidance process the world in our behalf and the harmony and order of life begins to become quite apparent.  There is an order that every living and inanimate thing shares, but with our self-styled, fear based, nervous system out-of-tune with the Cosmos resistance, we miss it. 

As we begin to align with “an order that knows no bounds” our lives begin to move in synchronicity, harmony and order.  The goal is full access to the Unknown, otherwise, known as Unconditional Love.  : )  Ultimately, we are a mechanism by which Innate Intelligence expresses itself into this dimension, for which we are “awareness.”  If we play our cards right and are very lucky, we can spawn off as a new life form, hence the concept of ascension.  Visionaries Thrive In All Times has some good remarks about this in the chapter Vision, I believe. 

For further information, go to
www.COREresonance.com/WhatisCOREtraining.htm
and check out Components of CORE Training.  I would also read DOMA: Autobiographical Notes in www.COREresonance.com/aboutjhamilton.htm
and I would also recommend the eBook, CORE Resonance at
www.COREresonance.com/eBook.htm

Namaste
J.Hamilton

The Artist’s Task

January 2, 2010

— Jack Riemer, Houston Chronicle

On Nov. 18, 1995, Itzhak Perlman, the violinist, came on stage to give a concert at Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center in New York City. If you have ever been to a Perlman concert, you know that getting on stage is no small achievement for him. He was stricken with polio as a child, and so he has braces on both legs and walks with the aid of two crutches.

To see him walk across the stage one step at a time, painfully and slowly, is an unforgettable sight. He walks painfully, yet majestically, until he reaches his chair. Then he sits down, slowly, puts his crutches on the floor, undoes the clasps on his legs, tucks one foot back and extends the other foot forward. Then he bends down and picks up the violin, puts it under his chin, nods to the conductor and proceeds to play.

By now, the audience is used to this ritual. They sit quietly while he makes his way across the stage to his chair. They remain reverently silent while he undoes the clasps on his legs. They wait until he is ready to play. But this time, something went wrong. Just as he finished the first few bars, one of the strings on his violin broke. You could hear it snap – it went off like gunfire across the room. There was no mistaking what that sound meant. There was no mistaking what he had to do. People who were there that night thought to themselves: “We figured that he would have to get up, put on the clasps again, pick up the crutches and limp his way off stage – to either find another violin or else find another string for this one.” But he didn’t.

Instead, he waited a moment, closed his eyes and then signaled the conductor to begin again. The orchestra began, and he played from where he had left off. And he played with such passion and such power and such purity as they had never heard before. Of course, anyone knows that it is impossible to play a symphonic work with just three strings. I know that, and you know that, but that night Itzhak Perlman refused to know that. You could see him modulating, changing, recomposing the piece in his head. At one point, it sounded like he was de-tuning the strings to get new sounds from them that they had never made before.

When he finished, there was an awesome silence in the room. And then people rose and cheered. There was an extraordinary outburst of applause from every corner of the auditorium. We were all on our feet, screaming and cheering, doing everything we could to show how much we appreciated what he had done. He smiled, wiped the sweat from this brow, raised his bow to quiet us, and then he said, not boastfully, but in a quiet, pensive, reverent tone, “You know, sometimes it is the artist’s task to find out how much music you can still make with what you have left.”

What a powerful line that is. It has stayed in my mind ever since I heard it. And who knows? Perhaps that is the [way] of life – not just for artists but for all of us.

So, perhaps our task in this shaky, fast-changing, bewildering world in which we live is to make music, at first with all that we have, and then, when that is no longer possible, to make music with what we have left. — Jack Riemer, Houston Chronicle